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Creating a Basic Banking System in C++ with Classes

Introduction

In this blog post, we will explore how to write a C++ program that uses a class to represent a basic banking system. This program will demonstrate the fundamental concepts of object-oriented programming and showcase the power of classes in managing banking operations.

Creating the BankAccount Class

To begin, we need to create a class called BankAccount that will serve as the blueprint for our banking system. This class will have various member variables and member functions to handle different banking operations.

Member Variables

The BankAccount class will have the following member variables:
– Account Number: A unique identifier for each bank account.
– Account Holder Name: The name of the account holder.
– Balance: The current balance in the account.

Member Functions

The BankAccount class will also have the following member functions:
– Constructor: This function will initialize the account number, account holder name, and balance when a new object of the class is created.
– Deposit: This function will allow the user to deposit a specific amount into their account.
– Withdraw: This function will allow the user to withdraw a specific amount from their account.
– GetBalance: This function will return the current balance in the account.

Implementing the BankAccount Class

Now that we have defined the member variables and member functions of the BankAccount class, let’s implement them in our C++ program.

First, we need to include the necessary header files:
“`c
#include
#include
using namespace std;
“`

Next, we can define the BankAccount class:
“`c
class BankAccount {
private:
int accountNumber;
string accountHolderName;
double balance;

public:
BankAccount(int accNum, string accHolderName, double initialBalance) {
accountNumber = accNum;
accountHolderName = accHolderName;
balance = initialBalance;
}

void Deposit(double amount) {
balance += amount;
}

void Withdraw(double amount) {
if (amount <= balance) {
balance -= amount;
} else {
cout << “Insufficient balance.” << endl;
}
}

double GetBalance() {
return balance;
}
};
“`

Testing the BankAccount Class

Now that we have implemented the BankAccount class, let’s test it by creating a few bank accounts and performing some banking operations.

“`c
int main() {
// Create a bank account for John Doe with an initial balance of $1000
BankAccount johnsAccount(123456, “John Doe”, 1000.0);

// Deposit $500 into John’s account
johnsAccount.Deposit(500.0);

// Withdraw $200 from John’s account
johnsAccount.Withdraw(200.0);

// Get John’s account balance
double johnsBalance = johnsAccount.GetBalance();

// Print John’s account details
cout << “Account Number: ” << johnsAccount.GetAccountNumber() << endl;
cout << “Account Holder Name: ” << johnsAccount.GetAccountHolderName() << endl;
cout << “Balance: $” << johnsBalance << endl;

return 0;
}
“`

Conclusion

In this blog post, we have learned how to write a C++ program that uses a class to represent a basic banking system. By creating a BankAccount class with appropriate member variables and member functions, we were able to perform banking operations such as depositing and withdrawing money. This program demonstrates the power of classes in managing and organizing complex systems.

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